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TEAMS Middle English Texts Series

827 results from this resource . Displaying 281 to 300

access to volumes that had belonged to John Shirley (c. 1366-1456). This scribe's work is datable to the reign of Edward IV (1460-83). Historians have gathered evidence that points to a ''setting of John Shirley and his successors in the

suggests how God will bless those who practice such generosity and punish those who neglect or refuse to do so. John Mirk was a canon at Lilleshall Abbey in Shropshire who wrote three extant books, Instructions for Priests, Manual Sacerdotis,

and Wynkyn de Worde, as well as making its way into editions of Chaucer by William Thynne, John Stow, and Thomas Speght. John Norton-Smith and E. Krausser each offer discussions of the manuscripts and their relationships,58 which can be classified

University Press, 1978. Robson, John Adam. Wyclif and the Oxford Schools: The Relation of the "Summa de ente" to Scholastic Debates at Oxford in the Later Fourteenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1961. Stacey, John.John Wyclif and Reform. London:

an "imaginatively conceived" romance in which time and space exist to serve the hero's needs, not to limit them.] Finlayson, John. "Ywain and Gawain and the Meaning of Adventure." Anglia 87 (1969), 312-37. [Claims that Ywain's adventures serve to characterize

Jean LeClerq, Monks on Marriage: A Twelfth-Century View. 4 St. Augustine, "Homilies on the Gospel of John; Homilies on the First Epistle of John Tractate VIII," in The Nicene and Post-Nicene Authors, vol. VII, ed. Philip Schaff (Grand Rapids, MI:

therfore, wythoute drede, knawleche we wyth devocion that Jerom is even unto John, for yyf we say that he is lesse then John we do derogacion unto John. This tretys of the praysyng of Jerom I sende unto thee, fadir

were short-lived. A case in point is the so-called Prophecy of John of Bridlington, which in the reign of Edward III was accompanied by an explanatory commentary. In John Capgrave's chronicle, however, two lines are extracted and applied to the

is an elegy written on the death of Margaret, daughter of John Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, also suggest that the poem was written by either John Prat or John Donne, both of them clerks of Pembroke.21 By far the candidate

pass into Paradise). 1547 John Baptyst in a desert sate. The son of Zacharias and Elizabeth through a miraculous conception, John lived in the desert of Judea from early manhood. Because he baptizes Jesus in Jerusalem, John is presented in

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

pp. 154-58. 4 Derek Pearsall, John Lydgate (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1970), p. 75. 5 It is interesting to note that the poem's sister piece Tabernacle was ascribed to Lydgate by an aged John Shirley, fifteenth-century publisher. Even though

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

the vayle that than dyd ryve, And dede men that rosse fro deth to lyve. Wytnes my moder and Seynt John And other that ther were, many one. In wytnes of that yche thynge, Myn awne sele therto I hynge.

had become synonymous with alchemist and magician. Pardoner-Shipman Link 11 It is unclear whether the phrase by John is an oath by St. John, such as the Shipman swears below (line 19), or a reference to the Pardoner by way

it was probably valued by clerics as a manual of doctrine and a resource for preaching; one fifteenth-century owner was John Pery, canon of the Holy Trinity at Aldgate in London.2 It may have served as preparatory reading for confession

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

itself. §19 My Fader above, beholdying thy mekenesse. Possibly by John Lydgate. Index no. 2238. MS: BL Harley 2251, fol. 78a (between 1464 and 1483). Edition: Henry Noble MacCracken, John Lydgate: The Minor Poems, p. 235. On the MS, see

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"Results" Manuscripts Online (www.manuscriptsonline.org, version 1.0, 25 October 2020), https://www.manuscriptsonline.org/search/results?ac=f&ct=lm%2Cod&ft=t&kw=john&sr=te&st=280