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TEAMS Middle English Texts Series

827 results from this resource . Displaying 61 to 80

fire. "And now call ye Little John hither to me, For Little John is a fine lad At gambols and juggling and twenty such tricks As shall make you merry and glad." When Little John came, to gambols they went,

and John the Baptist’s prologues, Conspiracy, Entry into Jerusalem, Last Supper, Conspiracy with Judas, and Betrayal. (See Sargent’s edition of Love’s Mirrour, pp. xliv–lxix.) The biblical sources for the Passion Plays are Matthew 23:37–28:20, Mark 14:1–16:11, Luke 22:1–24:12, and John

to the Marys; Peter and John at the Sepulcher Return to Menu of TEAMS Texts Copyright Information for this edition PETER AND JOHN AT THE SEPULCHER Play 36, Announcement to the Marys; Peter and John at the Sepulcher Edited by

Return to Menu of TEAMS Texts Copyright Information for this edition John Bossy has suggested that “pluralism in prayer is one of the advantages of a relatively non-par­ticipatory rite.”3 Several other Middle English prayers for both evening and morning survive,

John Lydgate's Prologue to the Siege of Thebes: Introduction Return to Menu of TEAMS Texts Copyright Information for this edition he was admitted to the monastery at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, in 1385 when Chaucer was finishing Troilus and

the dialogue is attributed to either the apostle John or John the Evangelist, who were widely regarded as being the same person in the Middle Ages; a few texts attribute it to John the Baptist, but this is clearly a

sweetness remains. (see note) (see note) (see note) (see note) Go To Unanimes esse qui secula John Gower: The Minor Latin Works, Notes JOHN GOWER, THE MINOR LATIN WORKS: NOTES ABBREVIATIONS: CA: Gower, Confessio Amantis; CB: Gower, Cinkante Ballades; Cronica:

because Langland offered satiric attacks on the clergy in his poem, later writers, including Chaucer and John Ball of the Peasants' Revolt, used Piers the Plowman to represent true Christian virtue as opposed to the corrupt established ecclesiastical order. These

ecclesiae Eboracensis. References to the Ordo paginarum are to REED: York, 1:16–27. Not recorded by either the original scribe or John Clerke, who was ordered to enter the Ironmongers’ pageant in 1567;1 nevertheless Clerke noted its contents in his handwriting

1382 John of Gaunt protected him from prelates who wished to suppress his more extreme formulations. For most of his career, though, Wyclif was regarded as a first-rank realist philosopher and teacher, with well-known students including Nicholas Hereford, John Aston,

Lydgate, Bycorne and Chychevache JOHN LYDGATE, BYCORNE AND CHYCHEVACHE: FOOTNOTES 1 …with a walking stick on his back, threatening the beast in order to rescue his wife 2 And cried, “Wolf’s head obedience!” (i.e., “Outlaw obedience!”) JOHN LYDGATE, BYCORNE AND

(see note) bear; (t-note) (t-note) Go To Mumming at Windsor Lydgate, MUMMING AT ELTHAM JOHN LYDGATE, MUMMING AT ELTHAM: EXPLANATORY NOTES ABBREVIATIONS: MP: Minor Poems of John Lydgate, ed. MacCracken; PPC: Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council; PRO: Public

John Gower, The Minor Latin Works: Est Amor Return to Menu of TEAMS Texts Copyright Information for this edition Fixus in ambiguis motibus errat amor. Instruat audita tibi leccio sic repetita; Mors amor et vita participantur ita. Lex docet

and it has received as its appropriate name The Lover's Confession. Go To Ecce patet tensus John Gower: The Minor Latin Works, Notes JOHN GOWER, THE MINOR LATIN WORKS: NOTES ABBREVIATIONS: CA: Gower, Confessio Amantis; CB: Gower, Cinkante Ballades; Cronica:

history and character, grounded upon other documents than those made use of by his former biographer, "Mister Ritson." Ed. by John Mathew Gutch. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1847. II, 351-55. Robin Hood and the Pedlars. In English and

believed: Symon, at fals man, decori nocet ecclesiarum; Myche sorwe he began, virus diffudit amarum. (C Text) See "Jack Philipot, John of Gaunt, and a Poem of 1380," Speculum 66 (1991), 330-41 at p. 340. Green concludes: "This poem [Tax

note); (t-note) parchment ocean; (t-note) (t-note) scribe; (t-note) (t-note) (t-note) Go To Of Theyre Nature John Lydgate, Beware (The Blynde Eteth Many a Flye): Notes JOHN LYDGATE, BEWARE (THE BLYNDE ETETH MANY A FLYE): EXPLANATORY NOTES ABBREVIATIONS: see the Introduction

anthology, omitting the prose tales of Melibee and The Parson's Tale, but continuing with eleven moral and religious poems by John Lydgate. The supplemental sections of The Cook's Tale accord with these pious inclinations, although the verses themselves seem to

manuscript to Ashmole 61, see the General Introduction. 7 NIMEV 3356; see Wilson, Descriptive Index of the English Lyrics in John of Grimestone’s Preaching Book. 8 For a facsimile of this MS, see Hogg’s Illustrated Yorkshire Carthusian Religious Miscellany. 9

has been captured, Little John rallies the spirits of the outlaws by reassuring them that since Robin has "servyd Oure Lady many a day . . . No wyckud deth shal he dye" (lines 133-36). Little John then promises that

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"Results" Manuscripts Online (www.manuscriptsonline.org, version 1.0, 26 August 2019), https://www.manuscriptsonline.org/search/results?ft=t&kw=john&sr=te&st=60